Answered By: Stephanie Folse
Last Updated: Oct 30, 2015     Views: 30

The Library had an inadequate number of seats for a campus the size of TCU.  The Library was also out of space for book stacks. There were times when TCU students could not find a place to sit in the building. Because of the turnstiles at the library entrance, library administrators were aware of the level of building usage since the turnstiles  record the total number of TCU IDs swiped each semester and the total number of unique IDs swiped each semester.

Over the years, library administrators kept as much of the book collection onsite as possible, finding places for seating throughout the building. Library staff erected book stacks along corridors; moved seating into corridors, found space for Frog Pods and other group collaborative spaces, and crammed as many seats into the Information Commons Lab as feasible. During the years, staff continued to expand the book collections as TCU expanded its curriculum and the size of its student body.

The building was out of options; continuing with the pattern of finding niches here and there was no longer possible.

TCU acquired a warehouse near campus and renovated the facility to support printed material preservation using national standards.  The TCU Library Annex now provides journal article document delivery and courier requests made of the approximately 1 million volumes maintained in the high density stack system. The Mary Couts Burnett Library holds 400,000 volumes that were selected based upon their high use and are current for the active curriculum.

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